Harris Gallery presents Patterson's 'private i'



Campus Times
April 14, 2000

 

by Stacey Mleczko
Staff Writer

The Harris Art Gallery offers new perspectives for University of La Verne students and gallery visitors.

The gallery is featuring an exhibit until May 5 entitled "private i" by artist Jeanne Patterson.

Two unique sculptures emerge from the floor on the south side of the gallery while a projected video image accompanied by background music demonstrates a different form of expression on the north end of the gallery.

Many interpretations of artistic expression are left up to subjective opinion. Each guest of the gallery is likely to exit the display with differing renditions of the presentation.

"It all depends on how you look at it," said senior diversified major Anna Caples on the exhibit.

"I didn't know the title of it. I just walked in and I looked around. It made me feel like I was at the ocean with the motion on the screen, the way the color moved, reminded me of what it looks and sounds like underwater. [The sculptures] looked like coral around me."

Caples said once she found out what it really was, she had to go back in for a second take. "It was a different meaning to me, more about perspectives. Thinking deeper into things, it may have meant taking an in -depth look and maybe there is a connection to the depth of the ocean."

That is similar to what Patterson said she tries to expose in her art. She said she wanted students in relation to her work to see on a personal and universal level.

She also said she wanted visitors to grasp the aspect of finding a creative outlet and a way of experiencing a creative light.

"Finding a creative balance in life makes every other experience worth while," said Patterson.

The artist paid a visit to the ULV campus Tuesday when she gave a lecture and slide show to interested students.

She confidently revealed the symbolism and source of creativity as she traveled through the last decade of her works.

Consequently, she also showed her attentive audience many of her creative outlets. Patterson made it clear through her presentation that she does not limit herself as an artist to one type of art but admits that she goes through different eras with different materials.

"When I have an idea, I become what it needs," said Patterson.

Her slides revealed her moments as an architect, photographer, sculptor, laborer, designer and model, as well as other professions she tailors herself to.

"It's very hard for me to draw things out with a clear vision. I have to build them and work them out," she said. "It's interesting to see the unexpected happenings, the elements that come to effect a piece."

Tandis Morgan, a sophomore behavioral science major, attended Patterson's lecture.

"I enjoy the symbolism in art but if I like the way it looks, it enhances my enjoyment even more," said Morgan.

If your interested in exploring your creative outlet or want to fabricate your personal symbolism from Patterson's art, visit the Harris Art Gallery between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The gallery will be closed during spring break but will reopen April 24. It is located in the Landis Academic Center. For more information, call ext. 4763 or walk by the gallery.