Singleton leaves for new adventures




Campus Times
December 12, 1997

 

by Araceli Esparza
Editorial Assistant

"The future is unlimited," said Bill Singleton. "I've still got a lot of energy. I'll probably never retire."

For Singleton, senior security agent of the University of La Verne's Campus Safety Department, this belief is one by which he consistently lives. Reflecting on his life, it is obvious that Singleton is more than a challenger and achiever-he is a man who fulfills each of his dreams with realities.

The motivation that has always been the driving force for Singleton has now led him to follow yet another dream.

As of last Sunday, Dec. 7, Singleton resigned from the Campus Safety Department.

Singleton's current goals include using his managerial background with Lamps Plus, a retail store specializing in lamps and lighting.

"I want to go into corporate management, and expect to manage a store, move up higher in the corporate ladder," Singleton said.

For his final day with the University, Singleton was given a going-away party, where he was appreciated with farewells and wishes of luck for the future.

"He left a lot of lasting impressions." said John Lentz, director of Campus Safety and Transportation. "Many people called to say their goodbyes. Even the president, [Dr.] Steve Morgan, called to say that he was sorry he couldn't make it because of previously scheduled conferences that weekend."

"I see him as being experienced. He finds something he enjoys and sticks to it," said sophomore Damien Alarcon, a student worker for the Campus Safety Department who has worked with Singleton regularly. "I think he gets jobs for the people. He's inspiring because he's involved. I'll miss him."

"Someone came up to me at the party and said 'You're losing one of the best.' Bill has a lot of talent, and I think this will be good for him," said Lentz.

According to Lentz, Singleton has been replaced by Kevin Kleinworth, the new Campus Safety officer.

"He's got a lot of motivation to come here and he has aspirations for law enforcement," Lentz said.

When Singleton left West Virginia in his early 20s, he left his hometown with a variety of ideas regarding what he wanted to do in life.

Having experienced four years of travel throughout Europe with "Uncle Sam's" Navy, Singleton pursued a position in the banking industry. After employment with banking, he realized it was time to explore other interests.

Therefore, 37 years ago, Singleton arrived in California with great dreams, as well as a continued pursuit within the banking community.

"I was an operations officer with City National Bank," said Singleton. "After a while, I joined the Rio Hondo [Community College in Whittier] Police Academy."

With this decision, Singleton made the transition into another chapter of his life, beginning a fresh page of memories and a new profession to pursue.

Following a successful completion of the academy, Singleton continued one of his aspirations, beginning his work with the Southgate Police Department. After nearly four years with the department, Singleton decided it was time to move toward another area of his life-personal business management.

Utilizing his knowledge and interest of old west history, Singleton decided to introduce Madeline's Wonderland, a mail order business which specializes in producing and selling a variety of old western products.

"The mail order business was named after my wife and has been running for 15 years now," said Singleton. "We sell western "Wanted" posters, old western playing cards with no numbers, pre-1864 and old early sheriff and marshall badges."

Though it seems Singleton had already fulfilled many of his dreams by this point, the truth is that the mail service would be anything but the concluding chapter of his accomplishments. The time had arrived to strive toward a continued education.

Singleton enrolled as an undergraduate pre-law major at Mount San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) in Walnut.

"I graduated with 90 units from Mt. SAC. I had taken so many extra courses, they [Mt. SAC administration] had to ask me to leave," Singleton said.

In 1993, Singleton transferred into ULV with an associate of arts degree in business and management, arriving with the objective of studying history of the west.

While enrolled, he was hired as a part-time employee for Campus Safety, a position that would later become a full-time opportunity.

Within the last two years, Singleton has pursued journalism, as he is a guest commentary columnist for the San Gabriel Valley Tribune, as well as a "West Covina Watch" writer for Highlander, a community newspaper within the same circulation area as the Tribune.

Singleton also serves as a counselor for West Covina High School and is the Community Services Commissioner for the city of West Covina.

"We will miss Bill. He'll be back periodically," said Lentz.

Singleton confirms that he will visit the University occasionally and admits that he has uch more to accomplish in life.

"God's got to let me live until I'm 100," he said. "I've got too much to accomplish."



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