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My job is not so glamorous yet
Posted Feb. 22, 2008

Galo Pesantes
Editor in Chief

I always get a lot of questions when I talk about my job with people around me. When I tell them I work for FOX Sports, they automatically assume I get into the best games, match-ups and access to different types of college and professional sporting events. In most cases, this is true.

The next question is usually something that ranges from, “Can you hook me up with tickets?” or my personal favorite “Can you get me an all-access pass?” The answer is always “no” to those type of questions.

It’s not that I don’t want to hook up my friends or close buddies, it’s just I don’t have it like that yet. It is still not feasible.

So as good as I sometimes make my job sound sometimes, it’s nothing permanent. I have what they call in many industries, “a freelance job,” which is basically done by random people and fill-in interns that are in their system.

I started doing this early, as an intern almost three years ago. Now, I have advanced more as strictly a production assistant on many shows and games for the Dodgers, Angels, Clippers, Lakers, Kings and several college games.

I even managed to interview some illustrious characters like Pete Carroll, as well as Matt Leinart, Reggie Bush and Lendale White while they were at USC. Yet as much as I love working games and getting the all-access treatment, it’s not the same experience you get every time.

My duties sometimes consisted of assisting the director, producers, talent, cameramen or anyone else who needed help with the production, which is fine but not really what I like to do all the time. I understand the industry and how you pay your dues to get in but this was not something I planned to do a lot.

When I tired of doing live events, I was asked by a co-worker to do a different type of P.A. work.

It would entail using handheld mini-DV cameras and shooting local and (sometimes not so local) high school sports and eventually college athletic events as well. It turned out to be more of a challenge than I thought. So at first, I was not very good but eventually I caught on and now you can say I am somewhat good.

However I still struggle from time to time with elements out of my control. Referees get in your way when you are shooting a football game, fans stand up during basketball games and things happen quickly in baseball and soccer.

I have shot almost every sport including the aforementioned as well as wrestling, volleyball, softball, swimming, water polo, track and field and tennis.

There have been times where it has been difficult beyond measure. Things like security not wanting to let me into the venue or not letting me shoot in certain spots or even technical problems with the camera, batteries and tapes get in the way. Keep in mind, when I go out there, it’s usually a one man operation. That means I am the producer, director and of course the shooter when I’m recording the content.

These shoots are fun most of the time because I love sports and enjoy experiencing them through others, which are usually some of the best in the area.

Still, it’s a job I like to do mostly and I get paid and even reimbursed for my mileage when I travel across Southern California shooting everything from high school to USC and UCLA sports but it is not something I’d like to do for the rest of my life.

It has been a job that has been perfect for my college time because I have been able to work hours flexible to my schedule while still doing what I like, but it’s not something I would recommend to everyone. My job is nice most of the time but it isn’t glamorous just yet.

Galo Pesantes, a senior journalism major, is editor in chief of the Campus Times. He can be reached by e-mail at gpesantes@ulv.edu.